Lowering Pharmacy Costs for Americans

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By proadAccountId-404241 13 Dec, 2017

America's opioid crisis is real, with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reporting that 91 Americans die every day from an opioid overdose.

According to the CDC, "deaths from prescription opioids—drugs like oxycodone, hydrocodone, and methadone—have more than quadrupled since 1999."

To be sure, there are a number of common sense solutions policymakers could take to address the crisis, but one of the most effective would be to  require E-prescribing (e-Rx) for controlled substances .

E-prescribing has been shown to dramatically reduce medication errors and fraud, and an increasing number of states now require its use. E-prescribing of controlled substances would help circumvent pharmacy shopping, enable better prescription tracking, and reduce fraud.

New York implemented e-prescribing for controlled substances in March 2016. A report by Surescripts shows that 98.1% of New York pharmacies are e-Rx enabled, and 91.9% of controlled prescriptions are sent electronically.

Click here to view the Surescripts report to see how e-Rx is growing in states across the country. 

As e-Rx grows in the states, it provides a model that could be adopted at the federal level, especially in Medicare Part D.

E-prescribing is proving to be a safe, efficient, simple way to address America's opioid crisis.

Federal policymakers should look to the states and use their successful e-Rx model to apply nationwide -- certainly within the Medicare Part D program, in which a growing number of prescriptions involve opioid medications.

H.R. 3528, the Every Prescription Conveyed Securely Act , would require e-prescribing for controlled substances in Medicare Part D.

By proadAccountId-404241 08 Dec, 2017
1. Generic competition incentivizes drug maker to slash cost of Viagra ( Fortune )

2. What are biosimilars and how can they reduce drug costs? ( Affordable Pharmacy Action Network )

3. Generic Rx competition, expediting access to biosimilars, will reduce drug costs "in a stroke" ( Newsweek )

4. Growth in retail drug spending freefalls ( FiercePharma )

5. The rate of spending on Rx in the U.S. slowed in 2016 ( The Pink Sheet—tiered subscription )
By proadAccountId-404241 07 Dec, 2017

The term “biosimilars” has been in the news a lot lately, not just in terms of the benefits they can provide, but also regarding their role in helping to reduce drug costs.

What are biosimilars?

According to a recent report by the RAND Corporation, they are "biosimilar versions of complex biologic drugs used to treat illnesses such as cancer and rheumatoid arthritis."

“Biologics are complex, protein-based drugs manufactured in living systems and include insulin, monoclonal antibodies to block inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis, and a range of drugs to treat cancer, multiple sclerosis and other serious diseases,” notes the RAND report.

Alex Brill of Matrix Global Advisors writes in a recent paper that, “Biosimilars are less expensive copies of these highly complex pharmaceuticals” that are just beginning to enter the U.S. market.

How can they reduce costs?

Brill’s paper notes that “Biologics are among the most expensive drugs available and represent a large and increasing share of U.S. drug spending.”

According to the RAND report, “While biologics are important treatments for many conditions, they often are expensive and patient copays for the treatments can be several thousand dollars per year.

“While 1 percent to 2 percent of the nation’s population is treated with a biologic each year, the drugs accounted for 38 percent of prescription drug spending in 2015,” continues the report. “In addition, biologics accounted for 70 percent of the growth in prescription drug spending in the U.S. between 2010 and 2015.”

Biosimilar medicines offer the potential to improve the cost-effectiveness of medicines by driving competition with the higher-cost biologic drugs.

How much can they save?

RAND finds that increased introduction of biosimilars could cut U.S. health care spending by $54 billion over the next decade.

“Biologics account for the fastest-growing segment of prescription drug spending, but biosimilars have the potential to help slow some of the increase,” said Andrew Mulcahy, lead author of the study and a policy researcher at RAND.

Brill agrees about the cost-saving potential of biosimilars and notes in his report that the key is providing incentives for physicians to prescribe biosimilars could increase utilization and reduce costs.

Increasing competition to reduce drug costs: Biosimilars are one option moving forward.


By proadAccountId-404241 01 Dec, 2017
1.   Pharma charity under fire for letting drug makers access data ( STAT News )

2. FDA announces plan to speed generic versions of treatments that combine a drug and a device ( Forbes )

3. Big drug maker pays $94 million to resolve allegations it made 'fraduluent patents' to delay generic Rx competition ( Becker's Hospital Review )

4. Justice Department announces new funding to help combat Rx opioid abuse ( AL.com/Washington Post )

5. HHS nominee says drug costs are 'top priority,' says he will work to increase competition between generic and brand name Rx ( Health Care Dive )
By proadAccountId-404241 17 Nov, 2017
  1. Pharmacy Benefit Managers "add value," lower drug costs ( RealClearPolitics )
  2. COMMENTARY: How Big Pharma Sandbags Generic Competition ( Wall Street Journal )
  3. Big drug makers accused of scheme to 'kill' generic Rx competition ( Burlington Free Press )
  4. FDA's moves to spur generic Rx competition meant to "tackle high medicine prices" ( FiercePharma )
  5. Pharmacy benefit managers "reduce drug costs" and provide "clinical value" to payers and patients ( Business Journals )
By proadAccountId-404241 10 Nov, 2017
  1. FDA chief tells big drugmakers to "end the shenanigans" ( Regulatory Focus )
  2. FDA announces new measures to improve access to lower-cost generic Rx ( FDA Blog )
  3. Health care experts, policymakers gather to discuss prevention strategies for America's opioid epidemic ( The Hill )
  4. FDA should speed approval of battlefield medicine, says head of FDA ( The Hill )
  5. FDA and FTC: 'Getting generic drugs to market faster is one of the best ways to combat high prices' ( Big Law Business )
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